ARC Readathon February 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • A Curse So Dark and Lonely, by Bridgid Kemmerer (Jan. 29, 2019) I loved this take on Beauty and the Beast. YA fantasy starring a girl named Harper who’s got cerebral palsy and finds herself taken from our world into a fictional world that needs someone to break the curse on the prince… in the course of one season.
  • A Gentlewoman’s Guide to Murder, by Victoria Hamilton (February 2019) Started strong but fell off in the last third or so. I’ll probably still give the next book in the series a try when it comes out.
  • More Than Words, by Jill Santopolo (February 5, 2019) A heartbreaker. Looks at the aftermath of loss and the moments when we evaluate who we are and why – and how much of who we are is to live up to others’ expectations of who we should be.
  • American Duchess, by Karen Harper (February 2019) An okay but kind of under-inflated look at the life of Consuelo Vanderbilt, who married into the Spencer-Churchill ducal line.
  • The Old Drift, by Namwali Serpell (March 2019) Well-written but a little too far into the magical realism area for my taste. Did not finish.
  • While You Sleep, by Stephanie Merritt (March 5, 2019) Whoa nelly. A brilliant psychological thriller with shades of Hitchcock and Du Maurier.
  • In Another Time, by Jillian Cantor (March 19, 2019) I enjoyed this, but it wasn’t really what I expected. I’m not used to WWII novels involving wormholes and time travel.
  • The Wall, by John Lanchester (March 2019) Okay. Not subtle at all. In response to severe climate change, a large nation builds a wall around itself and patrols it to keep any possible intruders out.
  • Little Faith, by Nickolas Butler (March 2019) Not an easy read, and inspired by true events. Told by the grandfather, the story is about a single mother and her young son who get involved with a charismatic religious leader who believes the boy to be a faith healer.
  • Daisy Jones & The Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid (March 5, 2019) I might have been into this if it had been written in a more standard narrative format, but the oral history structure to it was distracting and I found it hard to follow. Did not finish.
  • The River, by Peter Heller (March 2019) Devastating and gorgeous and evocative story of two young men on a canoe trip that goes wrong. Beautifully written and a total page-turner. I read it in one sitting.
  • My Lovely Wife, by Samantha Downing (March 26, 2019) Just okay. Signposted pretty hard, so most of the big reveals were predictable or not terribly surprising.
  • Zora and Langston, by Yuval Taylor (March 2019)
  • No Country for Old Gnomes, by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne (April 16, 2019)
  • All My Colors, by David Quantick (April 16, 2019)
  • The Tale Teller: A Leaphorn, Chee & Manuelito Novel, by Anne Hillerman (April 9, 2019)
  • Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, by Mary Norris (April 2019)
  • Phantoms, by Christian Kiefer (April 2019)
  • City of Flickering Light, by Juliette Fay (April 16, 2019)
  • Hold Fast Your Crown, by Yannick Haenel (April 2, 2019)
  • Beyond the Point, by Claire Gibson (April 2019)
  • The Princess and the Fangirl, by Ashley Poston (April 2, 2019)
  • The Better Sister, by Alafair Burke (April 2019)
  • The Red Scrolls of Magic, The Eldest Curses Book 1, by Cassandra Clare and Wesley Chu (April 2019)
  • The Binding, by Bridget Collins (April 2019)
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019)
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019)
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019)
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019)
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019)
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019)
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019)
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019)
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019)
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019)
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019)
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019)
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019)
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019)
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 112 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

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I’d just like to point out that 56 books is technically fewer than last year’s average of 60 per conference. Look at me, showing restraint. Or something.

  • The Other Miss Bridgerton, by Julia Quinn (undated) Julia Quinn is very good at what she does – she’s very reliable, and I always know I’ll enjoy the read.
  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • The Woman Inside, by E.G. Scott (Jan. 22, 2019) Weird and suspenseful and twisty psychological thriller. As I congratulated myself on guessing some points, I was continually surprised by some of the twists.
  • A Curse So Dark and Lonely, by Bridgid Kemmerer (Jan. 29, 2019)
  • A Gentlewoman’s Guide to Murder, by Victoria Hamilton (February 2019)
  • More Than Words, by Jill Santopolo (February 5, 2019)
  • American Duchess, by Karen Harper (February 2019)
  • The Old Drift, by Namwali Serpell (March 2019)
  • While You Sleep, by Stephanie Merritt (March 5, 2019)
  • In Another Time, by Jillian Cantor (March 19, 2019)
  • The Wall, by John Lanchester (March 2019)
  • Little Faith, by Nickolas Butler (March 2019)
  • Daisy Jones & The Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid (March 5, 2019)
  • The River, by Peter Heller (March 2019)
  • My Lovely Wife, by Samantha Downing (March 26, 2019)
  • Zora and Langston, by Yuval Taylor (March 2019)
  • No Country for Old Gnomes, by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne (April 16, 2019)
  • All My Colors, by David Quantick (April 16, 2019)
  • The Tale Teller: A Leaphorn, Chee & Manuelito Novel, by Anne Hillerman (April 9, 2019)
  • Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, by Mary Norris (April 2019)
  • Phantoms, by Christian Kiefer (April 2019)
  • City of Flickering Light, by Juliette Fay (April 16, 2019)
  • Hold Fast Your Crown, by Yannick Haenel (April 2, 2019)
  • Beyond the Point, by Claire Gibson (April 2019)
  • The Princess and the Fangirl, by Ashley Poston (April 2, 2019)
  • The Better Sister, by Alafair Burke (April 2019)
  • The Red Scrolls of Magic, The Eldest Curses Book 1, by Cassandra Clare and Wesley Chu (April 2019)
  • The Binding, by Bridget Collins (April 2019)
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019)
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019)
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019)
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019)
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019)
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019)
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019)
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019)
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019)
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019)
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019)
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019)
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019)
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019)
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 142 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

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I DID IT. I READ THEM ALL. I HAVE AN EMPTY SHELF WAITING FOR THE NEW HAUL FROM MIDWINTER!

  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018) Fascinating dual-timeline historical fiction – one timeline in 1997 in the immediate aftermath of Princess Diana’s death, and one in the 1930s as Wallis Simpson and the future Edward VIII grew more involved. I could pass on the 1997 timeline, but the one about Wallis was totally gripping.
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018) The ninth in a series called “Blessings.” Ditched without reading. I guess I’m a snob?
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018) An alright end to an alright trilogy. Fun reads, all three. Thirty years ago would have made an awesome BBC television literary adaptation.
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018) Honestly, a better read than I expected. Went in some unexpected directions and included a very funny scene in which adult foster siblings get stoned and have a talent show.
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018) Simple and compelling story about Hawaii in 1944 – military presence, racial tension re: the local population of Japanese ancestry, and a missing father. Powerful vision through a child’s eyes.
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018) I really wanted to like this, but I was already checking the page numbers after 30 pages to see if I’d hit my 50-page “does it grab my attention” mark. Did not finish.
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018) Devastating and totally engrossing. I may never look at trees the same way.
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018) First in a new fantasy series and I enjoyed it more and more as it went along. Now I’m just hoping that book 2 will be available as an ARC at this next conference!
  •  A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018) Not particularly complex murder mysteries, but the setting in post-WWI British-controlled India is unusual and vividly described.
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018) Like a rich dessert, I enjoyed the first few bites and then it got to be too much.

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 0 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018) A fascinating travelogue and memoir, and it’s kind of got me thinking about getting back on my bike.
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018) Oof. An interesting read about marriage, family, and heartbreak, dominated by the author’s kind of insufferable mother.
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018) Easy-read murder mystery, the tenth in the series. The narrator has a voice that reminds me of old radio dramas.
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018) An oddball set of stories, but some really interesting ones, like one about a magic razor that takes the user back in time 24 hours, but there is, of course, a catch.
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018) It’s possible I’ve taken an unfair dislike to this author, but I put this aside after about three pages.
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018) As it turns out, I’m not very interested in gangsters. Readable, but did not finish.
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018) Had trouble getting engaged in the narrative style, and got really confused about timelines. Did not finish.
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018) This book needs a trigger warning label. An unsettling look at the impact of childhood sexual abuse from a number of perspectives.
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018) Somewhere in between a sequel to Moby Dick and magical realism. A fascinating and deeply weird book.
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018) A collection of wistful stories focused on a coastal English town. Not sure short stories are my thing.
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019) What if Anne Frank had survived Bergen-Belsen and come back to Amsterdam to reunite with her father? An emotionally wrenching look at survivor guilt and figuring out not just how to live after the camps, but why to keep living.
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019) Twisty turny mystery – the old picture shows the family on the day of the birth of twins Seraphine and Danny, but there’s only one baby. Where did the other one come from, and which of them is in the picture?
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019) It’s getting good reviews on Goodreads, but I couldn’t get into it. Did not finish.
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019) Novel about the life of Hedwig Kiesler, a.k.a. silver screen bombshell Hedy Lamarr, from her performance as Empress Elisabeth in early 1930s Austria to the sale of war bonds in America in 1942. What a fascinating life that woman had.
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019) Decidedly odd multigenerational story surrounding a candlepin bowling alley in Massachusetts. Worth the read, even if I’m not entirely sure what to make of it all.
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated) Frothy fun contemporary romance novel, and it’s VERY easy to imagine the stars from BLACK PANTHER in the main roles. Yum.
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018) Ditched without starting. It’s the second in a trilogy and I wasn’t interested enough in the subject matter to read the first one.
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018) An interesting read when it stayed on topic, but some of its illustrative tangents went on a bit long for my taste. Still, it’s worth reading.
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  •  A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 25 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018) An interesting look at a subject I know little about – a cluster of highly influential science fiction writers in the 1930s-1960s. Boy, did they ever have weird lives.
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018) An extraordinary work of fiction. Translated from Russian, the novel tells of 18-year-old Sasha, who finds herself through strange circumstances enrolled at the mysterious Institute of Special Technologies, where things are not what they seem. A strangely compelling mix of metaphysical philosophy, thought experiments, and contemporary fantasy. I really hope the other two in the series will be translated, too!
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018) Turns out Cold War spy fiction doesn’t really get me going. Did not finish.
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018) This was a weird one and I’m not sure what to do with it. Fictional characters going through Life Stuff repeatedly visit the real performance art piece “The Artist is Present” by Marina Abramovic.
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018) What a fun read! 11-year-old Hannah Green is unfazed in the way only certain kinds of children can be by the discovery that her engineer/tinkerer grandfather is more than 300 years old and has been friends with the Devil for most of that time. The Devil, by the way, is experiencing… technical difficulties.
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018) A year in the Winters family, living at the Dakota building in the months leading up to the assassination of John Lennon. A good read until the last few pages, which were a real disappointment – seemed to end in the middle of a thought.
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018) I’m unclear as to the extent to which this was nonfiction or fiction. Could be a slightly embellished memoir of a kind? Anyway, it was an interesting and quick read.
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018) About a woman prone to near-death comas whose husband decides to bury her alive (while in a coma) and steal her money. Not my thing, but it showed up on the Goodreads Choice Awards seminfinals list. Did not finish.
  •  A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 56 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

Ways to Lose an Evening: The Saga of the Facebook Ad

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Due to family stuff, I had to cancel my participation in a holiday fair in a month, and the other two I applied to passed on me. So I decided to put the holiday fair fee amount toward advertising, and for reasons that I can no longer remember, I went with a Facebook ad.

It better be worth it, because I spent three solid hours on this tonight. I’m dead now. This is my ghost typing this. The Great Beyond isn’t all that great, folks.

This is how my evening went:

9:30pm: Add a few new items to Etsy listings. Wish for a way to auto-post new listings to social media. Realize there’s probably something like that already.

9:40pm: Click on Marketing tab in Etsy dashboard. Notice social media option.

9:42pm: Link Etsy to Twitter. Slightly edit automatic text for post about Charlie Brown ornament. Notice option for posting to “Facebook Ads.”

9:43pm: Click on link to Facebook Ads. Facebook Ad Manager opens. Begin entering information for ad,

10:00pm: WTF is Facebook Pixel?

10:20pm: Start uploading pictures. Spend solid five minutes trying to remember where the hell I put the image of the rainbow circle of lavender wands.

10:26pm: Grumpily post about frustration to Slack channel with friends.

10:30pm: I have to have a Facebook Page for the business in order to place an ad?

11:15pm: Have created Facebook page, including an only marginally-successful attempt to create an email address for the store, because my stupid phone doesn’t get stupid text messages inside unless I’m in EXACTLY THE RIGHT SPOT.

11:27pm: How did it get this late already? Trying to upload pictures for ad. Why do I have to put in the same text three times?

11:45pm: Try to link stupid Facebook Pixel, which I still don’t get, to Etsy store. Options are to do it through third party (Etsy is not an option), put the code into my website (pretty sure Etsy doesn’t let me do that, at least not at my level of participation), or send to developer (HAHAHAHA LIKE I HAVE A DEVELOPER). Get lost in Facebook help pages, which are only slightly helpful. Here’s a tip: don’t use the term you’re defining in the definition.

11:50pm: Get stuck in circle of Etsy dashboard clicks. Realize can create Facebook ad through Etsy rather than through Facebook.

12:00am: Ad seems… significantly less complicated than the options in the FB Ad Manager indicate. Why couldn’t I set a budget? Why couldn’t I set a time frame?

12:15pm: Go back to Ad Manager. Click with increasing emphasis until somehow, mysteriously, it allows me to submit the original ad. I genuinely have no idea what I did or if I fixed anything.

12:20am: Cancel ad created through Etsy. No idea if other ad will actually work, as I never figured out the damn Facebook Pixel stuff.

12:25am: FB Page says I have two notifications. Cycle through all Notification categories on Page and cannot find notifications.

12:30am: Computer blue-screens.

1:00am: Decide to vent feelings through blog post.

In conclusion, buy my ornaments. I’m going to bed.

 

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018) I really wanted to like this, but after 80 pages I kept finding myself finding excuses to do stuff other than read it. Did not finish.
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018) Heartwarming true story of a woman who took over coaching a high school football team in 1944 when there were no men left in town able to do it. Basically, “Friday Night Lights” for World War II.
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018) Oof, this was a tough read at times. Using the invasion of Normandy in 1944 as the metaphorical stone dropped into water, the story follows ripples from that moment backwards and forwards in time. It’s a short book but a good read.
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018) A poignant tale of how we drift off the path and away from our loved ones over time, and how hard it can be to find one’s way back. Please note the publication date has been pushed back to June.
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018) Imagine Emily Gilmore. Now imagine a Gilmorean wannabe who’s a Minnesotan Lutheran church lady/overbearing mother whose lesbian daughter gets pregnant without consulting her mother AND THEN refuses to divulge the name of the sperm donor. Made me laugh and wince.
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018) Now, I’ve never read the original DRACULA, and I’m notoriously wimpy about horror, but this one gripped. Though I definitely read it mostly in daylight and at home when other people were around.
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018) Kind of lead-footed. I admit to merely skimming the final third.
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018) Barely started. Couldn’t get into it.
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018) A novel about the Manhattan Project physicist Oppenheimer, as told by seven testimonials of fictional people who crossed his path from 1943 to the 1960s.
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018) A surprisingly challenging read for such a short novel. I found the nonlinear storytelling confusing.
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018) A deeply strange and uneasy story – kind a modern Gothic novel with a possibly-fictional manifestation of guilt and penance known as Melmoth following those who for one reason or another feel guilty, whether they are or not. And if you have done awful things but don’t feel the guilt of them, you think she’s a fairy tale to scare children.
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017) Boooooriiiiiiing. Got about a chapter in and literally fell asleep.
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 86 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

Tags

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018) A fascinating and fast-read piece of true crime writing, interspersed with seemingly solid evidence that the sordid story of Sally Horner’s 21-month ordeal played a role in creating Nabokov’s infamous novel. 
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018) Felt like homework within a few chapters. Bailed.
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018) More focused on form than story. Did not finish.
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018) It’s really annoying when an author doesn’t use quotation marks for dialogue. Did not finish.
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018) I didn’t really care much for this one. An irritatingly clueless main character, obsessed with wristwatches and running from the SEC.
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018) Definitely written in the shadow of #metoo. Set in late 1940s New York City, a Jewish woman lands a job as private tutor in a WASP-y family, looking after the angry tween daughter who has a leg damaged by polio.
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018) A fascinating read, but just as important, an approachable one. I know virtually nothing about either East Germany or punk rock, but Mohr made the story intelligible to me.
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018) Excellent. Slightly ambiguous search for a root system and a sense of place, told by a boy who begins as a slave in Barbados and ends up traveling the world in pursuit of freedom, science, and answers to questions he can’t quite formulate.
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018) Not as funny as the author thinks it is.
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018) Kingsolver is a remarkably gifted storyteller, and many moments in this book struck me straight in the heart. A paired storyline with past and present twining around each other, linked by one poorly-built house in a small community in New Jersey. Explores family, the power of money and charisma, and the fears that can arise when long-held beliefs are challenged.
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 117 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

Tags

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge, by Susan Hand Shetterly (August 7, 2018) Beautiful, simple writing about the role of seaweeds and kelps in the Atlantic coast biomes and local economies, with a particular eye on sustainability.
  • Temper, by Nicky Drayden (August 2018) The story got kind of convoluted, but the world the author creates in this one… wow. So cool.
  • The Story of H, by Marina Perezagua (August 2018) Just couldn’t get into this one.
  • Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island, by Earl Swift (August 2018) Another environmentalist monograph/microhistory, this time focused on the relatively isolated Tangier Island (elevation: 1-4 feet above sea level, currently) in the Chesapeake Bay, responsible for the bulk of softshell crabs in restaurants and markets, and eroding rapidly (like, VISIBLY) due to rising sea levels.
  • We That Are Young, by Preti Taneja (August 30, 2018) King Lear as set in modern-day India. Got about 20 pages in, but just wasn’t feeling it.
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • An Unwanted Guest, by Shari LaPena (August 7, 2018) This is the second thriller by this author I’ve read, and I really like her style. Very good with the last-minute WHAAAAAT moment.
  • A River of Stars, by Vanessa Hua (August 2018) A Chinese factory clerk has an affair with her married boss and becomes pregnant, and he sends her to a facility in California that caters to Chinese women who want their children born on American soil and eligible for American citizenship. She flees the facility and makes her way to San Francisco’s Chinatown, and forges a life for herself. An excellent read.
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018)
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018)
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018)
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018)
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018)
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018)
  • The Order of the Day, by Eric Vuillard (September 25, 2018) Very short, looking at the Anschluss in 1938. Not quite sure what to do with this one – I suspect it lost something in the process of translation from French.
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018)
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018)
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018)
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 147 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

Tags

, , , , , , ,

PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • White Hot Grief Parade: A Memoir, by Alexandra Silber (July 2018) A memoir about Silber’s loss of her father to cancer when she was 18, and how her friends gathered around to help. Real and darkly funny.
  • Whistle in the Dark, by Emma Healey (July 2018) An interesting sort of post-traumatic mystery: 15-year-old Lana disappears for 4 days, is found wet and bruised (this is where the story starts), then either refuses to talk about what happened or claims she remembers nothing. Her mother tells the story and is determined to find out why her daughter went missing and what happened while she was “lost.”
  • The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump, by Michiko Kakutani (July 2018) Sobering and thought-provoking.
  • Clock Dance, by Anne Tyler (July 2018) A tale of a woman who tries so hard to be what others need her to be that she practically disappears. Interesting – might resonate particularly with women with grown children/of an age to have grown children.
  • Open Mic Night in Moscow: And Other Stories from My Search for Black Markets, Soviet Architecture, and Emotionally Unavailable Russian Men, by Audrey Murray (July 2018) An oddball travelogue of a comedian exploring the former USSR. Made me laugh sometimes, but also made me feel totally exasperated by the author’s blithe lack of preparation for such a complex trip.
  • Believe Me, by JP Delaney (July 24, 2018) Twisty-turny psychological novel that plays cat-and-mouse with the unreliable narrator trope. Not my thing, but if it’s yours, look into this one.
  • The Last Thing I Told You, by Emily Arsenault (July 2018) A mystery, a whodunnit, and unfortunately for how I feel about the book, I finished it 10 days ago and have completely forgotten what it’s about. That tells you something.
  • What Remains of Her, by Eric Rickstand (July 2018) Mystery/thriller with a really random swerve at the end, but still an engrossing read.
  • The Locksmith’s Daughter, by Karen Brooks (July 2018) Spies, plots, theater, love, and secrets in Elizabethan London. SIGN ME UP.
  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge, by Susan Hand Shetterly (August 7, 2018)
  • Temper, by Nicky Drayden (August 2018)
  • The Story of H, by Marina Perezagua (August 2018)
  • Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island, by Earl Swift (August 2018)
  • We That Are Young, by Preti Taneja (August 30, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • The Cut Out Girl: A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found, by Bart Van Es (August 14, 2018) A different kind of Holocaust memoir: Lien de Jong was sent into hiding by her parents at age 8, after the Netherlands surrendered to Germany. This is the story of her years in hiding and her life after the war, written by the grandson of one of the couples who hid her.
  • Connect, by Julian Gough (August 2018) Not quite sure what to do with this one. It was totally gripping, but I can’t decide if I actually liked it. Near-future science fiction based in VR gaming, biotech, neuroscience, and unsupervised AI learning.
  • Sweet Little Lies, by Caz Frear (August 2018) Murder mystery for people who like Tana French but might prefer something slightly less doom-laden. Kept me up past my bedtime. Couldn’t stop for the night with just 80 pages left, now could I?
  • The Sea Queen, by Linnea Hartsuyker (August 2018) I just love this series so much. Second of a trilogy based on the sagas of Harald Fairhair, a ninth-century king of Norway. Vikings, battles, honor… it’s pretty great.
  • Under a Dark Sky, by Lori Rader-Day (August 2018)A murder takes place in a group house at a dark sky park. Not exactly Great Literature, but twistier than I expected, and kept me engaged.
  • An Unwanted Guest, by Shari LaPena (August 7, 2018)
  • A River of Stars, by Vanessa Hua (August 2018)
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018)
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018)
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018)
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018)
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018)
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018)
  • The Order of the Day, by Eric Vuillard (September 25, 2018)
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018)
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018)
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018)
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 178 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)