ARC Readathon July 2019

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New books!

  • Very Valentine, by Adriana Trigiani
  • The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein
  • Days by Moonlight, by Andre Alexis (April 2019) WTF even was that?
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019) Too odd for my taste. Did not finish.
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019) 2nd installment in a marvelous fantasy series, full of strong women both as protagonists and antagonists, magic, gladiators, and politics. Worth the read. Start with book 1.
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019) Difficult but gripping. Based on real stories of juvenile correctional facilities in 20th-century Florida.
  • Family of Origin, by CJ Hauser (July 16, 2019) Weird, but enjoyable. Exploring the dynamics of a very dysfunctional family in the midst of a community of oddball scientists studying “reverse evolution.”
  • Tell Me Everything, by Cambria Brockman (July 16, 2019) Twisty turny psychological thriller, as told by someone who’s clearly some sort of psychopath in the clinical sense of the word.
  • Home for Erring and Outcast Girls, by Julie Kibler (July 2019) Based on the true story of the Berachah Industrial Home in Texas in the early years of the 20th century. Takes a few turns that I didn’t expect. Really enjoyed this.
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Golden Wolf, by Linnea Hartsuyker (August 2019)
  • The Birthday Girl, by Melissa De La Cruz (August 6, 2019)
  • The Devil’s Slave, by Tracy Borman (September 3, 2019)
  • The Last Train to London, by Meg Waite Clayton (September 2019)
  • Don’t You Forget About Me, by Mhairi McFarlane (September 2019)
  • After the Flood, by Kassandra Montag (September 2019)
  • Invisible As Air, by Zoe Fishman (September 2019)
  • The Nanny, by Gilly MacMillan (September 2019)
  • The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution, by Eric Foner (September 2019)
  • The Third Founding, by Talia Carner (September 2019)
  • The Glass Woman, by Caroline Lea (September 2019)
  • Lies in White Dresses, by Sofia Grant (September 2019)
  • Country, by Michael Hughes (October 2019)
  • The In-Betweens: The Spiritualists, Mediums, and Legends of Camp Etna, by Mira Ptacin (October 2019)
  • The House of Brides, by Jane Cockram (October 2019)
  • If Only I Could Tell You, by Hannah Beckerman (October 2019)
  • A Bitter Feast, by Deborah Crombie (October 2019)
  • The Dollmaker, by Nina Allan (October 15, 2019)
  • The Bright Unknown, by Elizabeth Byler Younts (October 22, 2019)
  • The Painted Castle: A Lost Castle Novel, by Kristy Cambron (October 15, 2019)
  • Book of Colours, by Robyn Cadwallader (November 5, 2019)
  • The Other Windsor Girl: A Novel of Love, Royalty, Whiskey, & Cigarettes, by Georgie Blalock (November 2019)
  • The Golden Thread: How Fabric Changed History, by Kassia St. Clair (November 2019)
  • Invented Lives, by Andrea Goldsmith (November 5, 2019)
  • The Wicked Redhead, by Beatriz Williams (December 2019)
  • The Sacrament, by Olaf Olafsson (December 2019)
  • Oppo, by Tom Rossenstiel (December 2019)
  • The Clergyman’s Wife: A Pride & Prejudice Novel, by Molly Greeley (December 2019)
  • Lux, by Elizabeth Cook (February 2020)

ARC Readathon June 2019, Part 2

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New books!

  • Very Valentine, by Adriana Trigiani
  • The Art of Racing in the Rain, by Garth Stein
  • Days by Moonlight, by Andre Alexis (April 2019)
  • How Could She, by Lauren Mechlen (June 25, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • Family of Origin, by CJ Hauser (July 16, 2019)
  • Tell Me Everything, by Cambria Brockman (July 16, 2019)
  • Home for Erring and Outcast Girls, by Julie Kibler (July 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019) Lightweight historical fiction, tangled up in the complicated and still somewhat mysterious relationship and political history of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. Takes an unexpected look at severe post-partum depression.
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Golden Wolf, by Linnea Hartsuyker (August 2019)
  • The Birthday Girl, by Melissa De La Cruz (August 6, 2019)
  • The Devil’s Slave, by Tracy Borman (September 3, 2019)
  • The Last Train to London, by Meg Waite Clayton (September 2019)
  • Don’t You Forget About Me, by Mhairi McFarlane (September 2019)
  • After the Flood, by Kassandra Montag (September 2019)
  • Invisible As Air, by Zoe Fishman (September 2019)
  • The Nanny, by Gilly MacMillan (September 2019)
  • The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution, by Eric Foner (September 2019)
  • The Third Founding, by Talia Carner (September 2019)
  • The Glass Woman, by Caroline Lea (September 2019)
  • Lies in White Dresses, by Sofia Grant (September 2019)
  • Country, by Michael Hughes (October 2019)
  • The In-Betweens: The Spiritualists, Mediums, and Legends of Camp Etna, by Mira Ptacin (October 2019)
  • The House of Brides, by Jane Cockram (October 2019)
  • If Only I Could Tell You, by Hannah Beckerman (October 2019)
  • A Bitter Feast, by Deborah Crombie (October 2019)
  • The Dollmaker, by Nina Allan (October 15, 2019)
  • The Bright Unknown, by Elizabeth Byler Younts (October 22, 2019)
  • The Painted Castle: A Lost Castle Novel, by Kristy Cambron (October 15, 2019)
  • Book of Colours, by Robyn Cadwallader (November 5, 2019)
  • The Other Windsor Girl: A Novel of Love, Royalty, Whiskey, & Cigarettes, by Georgie Blalock (November 2019)
  • The Golden Thread: How Fabric Changed History, by Kassia St. Clair (November 2019)
  • Invented Lives, by Andrea Goldsmith (November 5, 2019)
  • The Wicked Redhead, by Beatriz Williams (December 2019)
  • The Sacrament, by Olaf Olafsson (December 2019)
  • Oppo, by Tom Rossenstiel (December 2019)
  • The Clergyman’s Wife: A Pride & Prejudice Novel, by Molly Greeley (December 2019)
  • Lux, by Elizabeth Cook (February 2020)

ARC Readathon June 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated) A fascinating, imaginative piece of historical fiction from three perspectives, all surrounding post-WW2 Nazi-hunters.
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019) I adored this. It’s a family, in all its permutations of relationship, and illustrates how one loves one’s family and wants to punt them into next week at the same time.
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019) I might try this as an audiobook. Reading Jamaican patois proved more difficult for me than I anticipated.
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019) Seemed kind of predictable. Did not finish.
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
    Not really sure what to do with this one. I liked the first two sections, but then got really confused.
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019) An odd but compelling story of family, grief, responsibility, and taxidermy.
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019) Skating on the edge of magical realism. Kept raising plot points and never resolving them. Very annoying, and 200 pages of my life I’ll never get back.
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 0 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

ARC Readathon May 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019) Do you like dogs? Then grab your Kleenex, because this is the book for you.
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019) An interesting interweaving of lives in a Cold War America setting, beginning with an affair between an aspiring astronaut and a idealistic girl struggling for freedom from her wealthy family, and leading through the Apollo program and an organization similar to the Weathermen.
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019) An unsettling study in ambiguous morality and the commodification of female bodies in a large-scale surrogacy operation.
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019) Twisty turny thriller, full of red herrings and darkness.
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019) Based on a true story, but did not finish. I find my appetite for WWII stories is not what it used to be.
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019) Mulgrew details the decline and deaths of her parents – her father, quickly, to metastatic lung cancer, and her mother, slowly, to Alzheimer’s. Interesting, funny, and heartbreaking exploration of family relationships and loss.
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019) I like the technical approach of this one, the idea of telling the story of a woman through the eyes of nine people who love her, but I was disappointed by the execution. It was very limited in the definition of love and the subject character felt rather flat.
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019) Oddball story that starts strong with an interesting premise of an alternate NYC, but doesn’t actually answer most of its own plot questions, so that was a bit disappointing.
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019) Couldn’t get into it. Did not finish.
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019) Nonfiction – short monograph about Hawaiian cowboys, largely focused on the late 19th/early 20th century rodeo culture.
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019) Too many subplots. Got bogged down and did not finish.
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019) Didn’t grab me. Did not finish.
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019) Reeling from the discovery of her husband’s serial infidelity, Sophie heads to France to figure things out and begin to heal the emotional wounds. Oddly, the second book in a row I’ve read from this list that includes a three-way.
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019) A long but easy read about a disgraced society girl working in an enthusiastically sub-par theater in 1940s New York and discovering that she likes sex. So… yeah. That’s about it. Amusing, though.
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 21 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

Tracking Jack Granoff: Introduction

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Jack Mexico City c1926 Meet Jack Granoff. I’m tracking and untangling his life story, to the best of my ability.

He was born Yakov Israelovich Granov in January, 1905, to Israel and Anna Granov, nee Kurzmann. He was the second child and second son in a comfortably well-off Jewish family living in the cosmopolitan city of Odessa, in the Ukrainian region of the Russian Empire.

Israel was the manager of a chocolate factory in Odessa, and Anna had once been his secretary. Their first son was Avram, and the two boys were eventually followed by a brother, Alexander, and two sisters, Yevgenia and Alexandra, though the third boy did not survive an early childhood illness. The youngest child, born in late 1917, was likely named for that lost child.

Israel had come up in the world. His father was a cord and tassel-maker in a city then called Yelisavetgrad. Anna’s father was a grain dealer, or possibly a dry goods merchant. They were consciously not shtetl Jews. When the Granov grandparents came to visit, the children couldn’t communicate much with them, because the old folks spoke Yiddish and the children spoke Russian.

Israel was interested in health fads, testing out vegetarianism and different exercise regimes at times. Family legend has him swimming in the Black Sea every day, even in winter. They were urban and comfortable. They had a nice apartment, with electricity, and a few servants. The children went to private schools and had clothes made to order by a seamstress who came to live with them while making the garments.

Jack Granoff was my grandfather. Though born in Ukraine, he identified himself as Russian. After the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 and the overthrow of the Tsar, the family struggled. Oral histories with Jack and his sister Jeanne (Yevgenia) indicate stretches of insufficient food, battles over the strategic city of Odessa between the White and Red forces, and growing tension within the family as Anna started to look toward immigration to join her brothers in the United States. Family stories when I was a child told me that Israel thought the situation would stabilize, that he was in denial about what we, with hindsight, know was coming in the newborn USSR. Now that I’m an adult, my older relatives are willing to admit that it seems likely that Israel had a mistress he was unwilling to leave.

As far as I’ve been able to tell so far, the way they all left Odessa – for they did all leave, eventually – was as follows. Anna and the two girls, known for most of their lives by the American names of Jeanne and Alice, left with a smuggler who would sneak them across the frozen landscape of Russian winter and into the safe region of Poland. That story, related briefly by Jeanne in an hourlong 1980 tape recording, is upsetting in many ways. Anna got typhus on the way out of Russia, and the group they traveled with abandoned her and the girls in a small village on the Zbruch River called Husiatyn, where Anna raved with fever and twelve-year-old-Jeanne tried to take care of her mother and her toddler sister in a boarding house full of soldiers and only blankets for doors. Pictures of Anna afterwards show her once voluptuous figure gaunt and haggard with illness and privation, and there is a solemn sadness in the eyes of the girls.

Eventually they got to Germany, where they received aid from the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, HIAS – which still exists, by the way – and spent a little time recuperating and meeting with relatives while waiting for visas to the United States. It’s around this point, it seems, that Anna, Jeanne, and Alice were reunited with Arthur (Avram, the eldest child) who had fled army service in the USSR to join his mother and sisters. From Hamburg they supposedly took ship to the United States, entered through Ellis Island, and joined some of Anna’s brothers in Detroit. The only complication here is that Arthur is not on the Ellis Island documents. Neither is he in the portion of the ship’s manifest that contains his female relatives.

Jack’s story is more complicated. He was supposed to leave with his mother and sisters, but at the time had a job as some kind of courier or chauffeur. He was not at home when the smuggler said it was time to go. He was in another town and missed it by a few days or less.

How he obtained the services of another smuggler to follow his mother and sisters is unknown, but he did. This fellow was less honorable than the individual paid by the women of the Granoff family (who may have been in it for the money but at least got his group safely over the border), and he turned his entire party over to the authorities as soon as they crossed into Poland, presumably for a fee. Jack, with this group, was arrested and imprisoned for some time, moved from place to place under terrible conditions. It wasn’t a gulag, but it sounds like what you’d expect from an early Soviet prison to punish people trying to run for the border. When the authorities needed more room in the prisons, some people, including Jack, were released on a promise to sin no more and the payment of a big ol’ fee.

I’m not exactly sure how Jack found out about the Nansen Passports, which aided stateless and refugees to find entry to any of a set of nations between 1921 and about 1938, but his oral history indicates that he obtained one and thus left Russia legally. By accepting a Nansen Passport, Jack became stateless. Whether he renounced his citizenship before or after obtaining the document is as yet unknown. We do not have any documents from this period for him, because his papers were stolen from him in Rotterdam.

Due to the Immigration Quota Acts of 1921 and 1924 in the United States, and in spite of having immediate family already established in the US, Jack could not get a visa to join his mother and siblings. He had by this time fallen in with a group of single Russian men of a similar age to him, and I guess someone had the bright idea to try Mexico instead. Anyway, that’s where he ended up around 1925, and we have a Mexican passport in his name to prove it. My current area of inquiry is trying to get more information on the significance of the Mexican passport – does it indicate naturalization of some kind or is it part of the Nansen Passport process? I have information feelers out to the Mexican consulate in San Francisco, El Archivo General de la Nación México, and the Mexican Museum in San Francisco. No hits yet, but I’ll keep trying.

It is unfortunately at this point in the story that the oral history cuts off, in the middle of a sentence about his first twenty-four hours in Mexico.

We know that he was in Mexico for a few years, and we have a couple photos from that time. The picture at the start of this post is Jack in 1926 in Mexico City, at about age 21.

We know that Jack left Mexico because Arthur got tuberculosis and their mother sent a plea for her other son to come closer and help to support the family. I can only imagine that for some reason he still could not remain in the United States, because the documentary record picks up around 1928 in Windsor, Ontario, in Canada. Right across the Great Lakes from Detroit, but still divided by an international border.

This is where things get REALLY confusing. We have three short-term visit permits for Jack to come to Detroit from Canada, dating between 1930 and 1933. We know that he was in Detroit for much of the 1930s and possibly early 1940s, in business with his brother Arthur. Yet in 1934, he became a naturalized citizen of Canada, and his records show he entered Canada FROM Detroit. Thanks to a friend in Canada, I have a digital copy of his naturalization forms, and they are a wealth of startling information (he claimed his occupation was farming? He’s already fluent in English, his third vernacular language?). Like most of the documents I’ve unearthed, they raise more questions than they answer.

The next question is tracking down the specifics of his US Citizenship, which seems to have taken place in the later 1940s. Documents list El Paso, Texas, as his official port of entry, and his application to naturalize was processed in Detroit, Michigan. That’s in process, as you may have gathered from my recent grumpy post on the subject.

By circuitous routes and a lot of forks in many roads, he found his way from a privileged childhood in Imperial Russia to an adult life in rural California.

Jack Granoff died in February, 1987. I acknowledge my obsession with his travels may have begun with a desire to know the only grandparent I never knew in person, but given the story I’ve just told you, wouldn’t you want to know more?

He left school after sixth grade, yet learned to function in three very different languages – Russian, Spanish, and English. Many jobs, many attempted careers, and an extraordinary gift for investing in losing propositions, but a passion for food and music that run strong in his descendants. I sometimes look at these documents and listen to the recordings of him and wonder who he would have been if his education hadn’t cut off short at age 12.

So that’s where we are in tracking Jack Granoff.

Currently in process:

  1. Get context for Mexican passport.
  2. Track US Naturalization file.
  3. Keep tabs on request with archives of the League of Nations, which holds records of Nansen Passports.

Stay tuned. There’ll be more.

Adventures in Genealogy

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I have made a somewhat irksome discovery tonight – I have an unfortunate tendency to make such discoveries at unreasonable hours of the night – and instead of muttering about it in bed in the dark for a while, I’m going to try writing it out. I’ve been meaning for some time to blog this project, after all.

I hope my few readers will forgive my starting in the middle of the story and giving only the bare outlines for now.

So here’s the deal: A few years ago, I transcribed a set of audio recordings we have of my late grandfather and one of his sisters, in which they describe their memories of childhood and leaving their homeland in Odessa, Ukraine. While my great-aunt Jeanne’s story is harrowing at many points, it was my grandfather, Jack Granoff, who sticks with me. He died when I was an infant, and this might have been the first time I heard his voice at any length.

I grew up knowing his story. How after the Russian Revolution of 1917, his family – Jews and a factory manager – suffered. How my great-grandmother decided to leave, whether her husband would or no, and contacted a smuggler to get her and her children across the border of the USSR into Poland. How my grandfather was away when the smuggler came, and how he tried to follow, getting arrested in Poland for his pains and sent back to Russia.

Now, the way I remember understanding the story from that point in childhood is that he tried again, and snuck across the border, this time successfully. In school reports on family history and immigration, I confidently told my friends that due to immigration quotas in the 1920s, my grandfather got turned away at Ellis Island and had to get off the boat at its next stop in Mexico, where he lived for a few years before joining his mother and siblings in Detroit, Michigan.

Technically speaking, only a few points of that are actually wrong. The second time, the oral history indicates, he left Russia legally on a Nansen Passport. He never actually went to Ellis Island, but got a visa for Mexico while in Rotterdam, as visas for the US were not to be had. Between Mexico and the US, he lived in Canada for a while.

I’m going to go back and flesh this all out in later posts, partly because it’s fascinating, and partly because I want a record of the discovery process, both what I’ve done so far and what’s coming, because he’s been dead since 1987 and he’s driving me batty – every time I unearth a new document, it muddies the waters and confuses the hell out of everyone in the family. I want to go back in time and make him fill out a timeline of his life.

Anyway, tonight. Back in December, I discovered that the US Citizenship and Immigration Services has a Genealogy section that can turn up old naturalization documents and alien registration documents for family history researchers. Naturally, I requested them. First you pay $65 for them to look up whether the files exist and to tell you what the file numbers are. THEN you pay another $65 for EACH FILE, which in this case is two. I get that they’re funded entirely by these fees, but good grief.

I submitted the request for copies of the files on January 12. When I didn’t hear back within the 30-day window, I assumed it was due to the extended government shutdown earlier this year, and that there would be a backlog. Tonight it occurred to me that it’s been nearly four months, so I checked on the status of the request.

USCIS claims it was requested and paid for on January 12 (correct) and closed on January 29 (excuse me?).

Closed they may say it is, but I have received no communication from them since they acknowledged my payment of $130 on January 12. I have, naturally, sent a polite inquiry to their general email, asking for clarification on what exactly is going on, because I have received no files.

It’s times like this that I’m very grateful that being annoyed brings out my SAT vocabulary in writing. In person it usually brings out tears, so it’s much better to be annoyed at a distance.

ARC Readathon April 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • No Country for Old Gnomes, by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne (April 16, 2019) Cheerfully absurd fantasy story, a semisequel to Kill the Farm Boy, about a war between the halflings (and their war alpacas) and the aggressively tidy and positive gnomes. Hijinks ensue. A slight feeling of Fantasy Mad Libs, and if you’re on the right wavelength – and I am – it’s hysterical.
  • All My Colors, by David Quantick (April 16, 2019) A strange story about a repellently egotistical jackass who begins remembering a bestselling novel nobody else has ever heard of. Naturally, he publishes it, and Spooky Bad Stuff starts happening.
  • The Tale Teller: A Leaphorn, Chee & Manuelito Novel, by Anne Hillerman (April 9, 2019) Anne Hillerman took this series over after the death of her father, who began it. A mystery series set among the primarily-native police force on the Navajo Reservation. I’m curious enough to have added others from the series to my to-read list.
  • Phantoms, by Christian Kiefer (April 2019) Very unsettling and totally gripping read. Recent Vietnam veteran John, trying to figure things out after coming home, stays with his grandmother in Placer County, CA, and finds himself dragged into and fascinated by the story of Ray Takashima, veteran of the 442nd in WWII, who returned home to discover that the prejudices toward Japanese-Americans had not changed and his home was no longer home.
  • City of Flickering Light, by Juliette Fay (April 16, 2019) Lightweight but enjoyable story about 1920s Hollywood and three friends trying to make their ways through the showbiz world. Not exactly Great Literature, but I really like this kind of story.
  • Hold Fast Your Crown, by Yannick Haenel (April 2, 2019) Very weird. Did not finish.
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019)
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019)
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019)
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019)
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019)
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019)
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019)
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019)
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019)
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019)
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019)
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019)
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019)
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019)
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 51 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

ARC Readathon March 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • Zora and Langston, by Yuval Taylor (March 2019) An interesting nonfiction look at the friendship and spectacular friend-breakup of Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes. I don’t know much about the Harlem Renaissance, but found this approachable and not too difficult to follow.
  • No Country for Old Gnomes, by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne (April 16, 2019)
  • All My Colors, by David Quantick (April 16, 2019)
  • The Tale Teller: A Leaphorn, Chee & Manuelito Novel, by Anne Hillerman (April 9, 2019)
  • Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, by Mary Norris (April 2019) Memoirish essays about the author’s love for all things Greek, including the mythology, the ancient plays, and the modern and ancient versions of the language. Quite charming.
  • Phantoms, by Christian Kiefer (April 2019)
  • City of Flickering Light, by Juliette Fay (April 16, 2019)
  • Hold Fast Your Crown, by Yannick Haenel (April 2, 2019)
  • Beyond the Point, by Claire Gibson (April 2019) Setting aside the weird feeling that stems from a time I remember vividly now qualifying as historical fiction instead of contemporary fiction… I enjoyed this slice-of-life featuring three women who attend West Point Military Academy and the years afterwards, and how their lives are utterly changed by the terrorist attacks on the US in 2001.
  • The Princess and the Fangirl, by Ashley Poston (April 2, 2019) Cute YA, cheers for featuring same-sex relationships, but not for me. Just a little too sweet for my taste. Did not finish.
  • The Better Sister, by Alafair Burke (April 2019) Some mysteries you read to find out whodunnit. Others you read because you can kind of tell where the end point is going to be but you have no idea how the author’s going to get you from point A to point B.
  • The Red Scrolls of Magic, The Eldest Curses Book 1, by Cassandra Clare and Wesley Chu (April 2019) It may be the first in a series, but it’s clearly part of a larger literary world. Lost interest, did not finish.
  • The Binding, by Bridget Collins (April 2019) Now here’s a fascinating premise – in this world, a true book is a memory of an actual person, bound into covers and erased from the person’s mind. Burning the book restores the memories. Follows Emmett Farmer, apprentice bookbinder, through some of his education and the discovery of a book with his own name on it, held by his master.
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019)
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019)
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019)
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019)
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019)
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019)
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019)
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019)
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019)
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019)
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019)
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019)
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019)
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019)
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 81 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)

ARC Readathon February 2019

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Moving along!

  • Huntress, by Kate Quinn (Undated)
  • A Curse So Dark and Lonely, by Bridgid Kemmerer (Jan. 29, 2019) I loved this take on Beauty and the Beast. YA fantasy starring a girl named Harper who’s got cerebral palsy and finds herself taken from our world into a fictional world that needs someone to break the curse on the prince… in the course of one season.
  • A Gentlewoman’s Guide to Murder, by Victoria Hamilton (February 2019) Started strong but fell off in the last third or so. I’ll probably still give the next book in the series a try when it comes out.
  • More Than Words, by Jill Santopolo (February 5, 2019) A heartbreaker. Looks at the aftermath of loss and the moments when we evaluate who we are and why – and how much of who we are is to live up to others’ expectations of who we should be.
  • American Duchess, by Karen Harper (February 2019) An okay but kind of under-inflated look at the life of Consuelo Vanderbilt, who married into the Spencer-Churchill ducal line.
  • The Old Drift, by Namwali Serpell (March 2019) Well-written but a little too far into the magical realism area for my taste. Did not finish.
  • While You Sleep, by Stephanie Merritt (March 5, 2019) Whoa nelly. A brilliant psychological thriller with shades of Hitchcock and Du Maurier.
  • In Another Time, by Jillian Cantor (March 19, 2019) I enjoyed this, but it wasn’t really what I expected. I’m not used to WWII novels involving wormholes and time travel.
  • The Wall, by John Lanchester (March 2019) Okay. Not subtle at all. In response to severe climate change, a large nation builds a wall around itself and patrols it to keep any possible intruders out.
  • Little Faith, by Nickolas Butler (March 2019) Not an easy read, and inspired by true events. Told by the grandfather, the story is about a single mother and her young son who get involved with a charismatic religious leader who believes the boy to be a faith healer.
  • Daisy Jones & The Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid (March 5, 2019) I might have been into this if it had been written in a more standard narrative format, but the oral history structure to it was distracting and I found it hard to follow. Did not finish.
  • The River, by Peter Heller (March 2019) Devastating and gorgeous and evocative story of two young men on a canoe trip that goes wrong. Beautifully written and a total page-turner. I read it in one sitting.
  • My Lovely Wife, by Samantha Downing (March 26, 2019) Just okay. Signposted pretty hard, so most of the big reveals were predictable or not terribly surprising.
  • Zora and Langston, by Yuval Taylor (March 2019)
  • No Country for Old Gnomes, by Delilah S. Dawson and Kevin Hearne (April 16, 2019)
  • All My Colors, by David Quantick (April 16, 2019)
  • The Tale Teller: A Leaphorn, Chee & Manuelito Novel, by Anne Hillerman (April 9, 2019)
  • Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, by Mary Norris (April 2019)
  • Phantoms, by Christian Kiefer (April 2019)
  • City of Flickering Light, by Juliette Fay (April 16, 2019)
  • Hold Fast Your Crown, by Yannick Haenel (April 2, 2019)
  • Beyond the Point, by Claire Gibson (April 2019)
  • The Princess and the Fangirl, by Ashley Poston (April 2, 2019)
  • The Better Sister, by Alafair Burke (April 2019)
  • The Red Scrolls of Magic, The Eldest Curses Book 1, by Cassandra Clare and Wesley Chu (April 2019)
  • The Binding, by Bridget Collins (April 2019)
  • The Wonder of Lost Causes, by Nick Trout (May 2019)
  • America Was Hard to Find, by Kathleen Alcott (May 2019)
  • The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (May 7, 2019)
  • The Last Time I Saw You, by Liv Constantine (May 2019)
  • Resistance Women, by Jennifer Chiaverini (May 2019)
  • How To Forget: A Daughter’s Memoir, by Kate Mulgrew (May 2019)
  • The Nine-Chambered Heart, by Janice Pariat (May 2019)
  • Westside, by W.M. Akers (May 2019)
  • Biloxi, by Mary Miller (May 2019)
  • Aloha Rodeo, by David Wolman and Julian Smith (May 28, 2019)
  • Disappearing Earth, by Julia Phillips (May 2019)
  • The Most Fun We Ever Had, by Claire Lombardo (June 25, 2019)
  • Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn (June 2019)
  • The Islanders, by Meg Mitchell Moore (June 2019)
  • More News Tomorrow, by Susan Richards Shreve (June 2019)
  • The Unbreakables, by Lisa Barr (June 4, 2019)
  • Travelers, by Helon Habila (June 2019)
  • City of Girls, by Elizabeth Gilbert (June 4, 2019)
  • Mostly Dead Things, by Kristen Arnett (June 4, 2019)
  • Costalegre, by Courtney Maum (July 22, 2019)
  • Beirut Hellfire Society, by Rawi Hage (July 2019)
  • Protect The Prince, Crown of Shards #2, by Jennifer Estep (July 2019)
  • The Nickel Boys, by Colson Whitehead (July 16, 2019)
  • The Peacock Summer, by Hannah Richell (July 2, 2019)
  • Gravity is the Thing, by Jaclyn Moriarty (July 2019)
  • The Golden Hour, by Beatriz Williams (July 2019)
  • The Hotel Neversink, by Adam O’Fallon Price (Aug. 6, 2019)
  • The Perfect Wife, by JP Delaney (Aug. 6, 2019)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 112 (ALA Annual 2019, June 20-25, 2019)