ARC Readathon Update

Tags

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018) A fascinating and fast-read piece of true crime writing, interspersed with seemingly solid evidence that the sordid story of Sally Horner’s 21-month ordeal played a role in creating Nabokov’s infamous novel. 
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018) Felt like homework within a few chapters. Bailed.
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018) More focused on form than story. Did not finish.
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018) It’s really annoying when an author doesn’t use quotation marks for dialogue. Did not finish.
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018) I didn’t really care much for this one. An irritatingly clueless main character, obsessed with wristwatches and running from the SEC.
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018) Definitely written in the shadow of #metoo. Set in late 1940s New York City, a Jewish woman lands a job as private tutor in a WASP-y family, looking after the angry tween daughter who has a leg damaged by polio.
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018) A fascinating read, but just as important, an approachable one. I know virtually nothing about either East Germany or punk rock, but Mohr made the story intelligible to me.
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018) Excellent. Slightly ambiguous search for a root system and a sense of place, told by a boy who begins as a slave in Barbados and ends up traveling the world in pursuit of freedom, science, and answers to questions he can’t quite formulate.
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018) Not as funny as the author thinks it is.
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018) Kingsolver is a remarkably gifted storyteller, and many moments in this book struck me straight in the heart. A paired storyline with past and present twining around each other, linked by one poorly-built house in a small community in New Jersey. Explores family, the power of money and charisma, and the fears that can arise when long-held beliefs are challenged.
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 117 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

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ARC Readathon Update

Tags

, , , , , , ,

PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge, by Susan Hand Shetterly (August 7, 2018) Beautiful, simple writing about the role of seaweeds and kelps in the Atlantic coast biomes and local economies, with a particular eye on sustainability.
  • Temper, by Nicky Drayden (August 2018) The story got kind of convoluted, but the world the author creates in this one… wow. So cool.
  • The Story of H, by Marina Perezagua (August 2018) Just couldn’t get into this one.
  • Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island, by Earl Swift (August 2018) Another environmentalist monograph/microhistory, this time focused on the relatively isolated Tangier Island (elevation: 1-4 feet above sea level, currently) in the Chesapeake Bay, responsible for the bulk of softshell crabs in restaurants and markets, and eroding rapidly (like, VISIBLY) due to rising sea levels.
  • We That Are Young, by Preti Taneja (August 30, 2018) King Lear as set in modern-day India. Got about 20 pages in, but just wasn’t feeling it.
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab’s Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • An Unwanted Guest, by Shari LaPena (August 7, 2018) This is the second thriller by this author I’ve read, and I really like her style. Very good with the last-minute WHAAAAAT moment.
  • A River of Stars, by Vanessa Hua (August 2018) A Chinese factory clerk has an affair with her married boss and becomes pregnant, and he sends her to a facility in California that caters to Chinese women who want their children born on American soil and eligible for American citizenship. She flees the facility and makes her way to San Francisco’s Chinatown, and forges a life for herself. An excellent read.
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018)
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018)
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018)
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018)
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018)
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018)
  • The Order of the Day, by Eric Vuillard (September 25, 2018) Very short, looking at the Anschluss in 1938. Not quite sure what to do with this one – I suspect it lost something in the process of translation from French.
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018)
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018)
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018)
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 147 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

Tags

, , , , , , ,

PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • White Hot Grief Parade: A Memoir, by Alexandra Silber (July 2018) A memoir about Silber’s loss of her father to cancer when she was 18, and how her friends gathered around to help. Real and darkly funny.
  • Whistle in the Dark, by Emma Healey (July 2018) An interesting sort of post-traumatic mystery: 15-year-old Lana disappears for 4 days, is found wet and bruised (this is where the story starts), then either refuses to talk about what happened or claims she remembers nothing. Her mother tells the story and is determined to find out why her daughter went missing and what happened while she was “lost.”
  • The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump, by Michiko Kakutani (July 2018) Sobering and thought-provoking.
  • Clock Dance, by Anne Tyler (July 2018) A tale of a woman who tries so hard to be what others need her to be that she practically disappears. Interesting – might resonate particularly with women with grown children/of an age to have grown children.
  • Open Mic Night in Moscow: And Other Stories from My Search for Black Markets, Soviet Architecture, and Emotionally Unavailable Russian Men, by Audrey Murray (July 2018) An oddball travelogue of a comedian exploring the former USSR. Made me laugh sometimes, but also made me feel totally exasperated by the author’s blithe lack of preparation for such a complex trip.
  • Believe Me, by JP Delaney (July 24, 2018) Twisty-turny psychological novel that plays cat-and-mouse with the unreliable narrator trope. Not my thing, but if it’s yours, look into this one.
  • The Last Thing I Told You, by Emily Arsenault (July 2018) A mystery, a whodunnit, and unfortunately for how I feel about the book, I finished it 10 days ago and have completely forgotten what it’s about. That tells you something.
  • What Remains of Her, by Eric Rickstand (July 2018) Mystery/thriller with a really random swerve at the end, but still an engrossing read.
  • The Locksmith’s Daughter, by Karen Brooks (July 2018) Spies, plots, theater, love, and secrets in Elizabethan London. SIGN ME UP.
  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge, by Susan Hand Shetterly (August 7, 2018)
  • Temper, by Nicky Drayden (August 2018)
  • The Story of H, by Marina Perezagua (August 2018)
  • Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island, by Earl Swift (August 2018)
  • We That Are Young, by Preti Taneja (August 30, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • The Cut Out Girl: A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found, by Bart Van Es (August 14, 2018) A different kind of Holocaust memoir: Lien de Jong was sent into hiding by her parents at age 8, after the Netherlands surrendered to Germany. This is the story of her years in hiding and her life after the war, written by the grandson of one of the couples who hid her.
  • Connect, by Julian Gough (August 2018) Not quite sure what to do with this one. It was totally gripping, but I can’t decide if I actually liked it. Near-future science fiction based in VR gaming, biotech, neuroscience, and unsupervised AI learning.
  • Sweet Little Lies, by Caz Frear (August 2018) Murder mystery for people who like Tana French but might prefer something slightly less doom-laden. Kept me up past my bedtime. Couldn’t stop for the night with just 80 pages left, now could I?
  • The Sea Queen, by Linnea Hartsuyker (August 2018) I just love this series so much. Second of a trilogy based on the sagas of Harald Fairhair, a ninth-century king of Norway. Vikings, battles, honor… it’s pretty great.
  • Under a Dark Sky, by Lori Rader-Day (August 2018)A murder takes place in a group house at a dark sky park. Not exactly Great Literature, but twistier than I expected, and kept me engaged.
  • An Unwanted Guest, by Shari LaPena (August 7, 2018)
  • A River of Stars, by Vanessa Hua (August 2018)
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018)
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018)
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018)
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018)
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018)
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018)
  • The Order of the Day, by Eric Vuillard (September 25, 2018)
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018)
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018)
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018)
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 178 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

Tags

, , , , , , ,

PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • Bono: The Amazing Story of a Rescue Cat Who Inspired a Community, by Helen Brown (June 2018)
    Sweet and straightforward. And really, who doesn’t love the idea of a cat named Bono?
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018) Language that drips and lingers like an afternoon nap in on a hot day – anything is possible and time moves in fits and starts. Told by a child and a young teenager in Colombia during the final years of Pablo Escobar’s life, and inspired by events in the author’s early life.
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018) A sensational true-crime book about an 1849 murder of a doctor in Cambridge, MA, in which a Harvard professor was implicated. This case played a role in defining the concept of “beyond a reasonable doubt” in murder trials.
  • White Hot Grief Parade: A Memoir, by Alexandra Silber (July 2018)
  • Whistle in the Dark, by Emma Healey (July 2018)
  • The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump, by Michiko Kakutani (July 2018)
  • Clock Dance, by Anne Tyler (July 2018)
  • Open Mic Night in Moscow: And Other Stories from My Search for Black Markets, Soviet Architecture, and Emotionally Unavailable Russian Men, by Audrey Murray (July 2018)
  • Believe Me, by JP Delaney (July 24, 2018)
  • The Last Thing I Told You, by Emily Arsenault (July 2018)
  • What Remains of Her, by Eric Rickstand (July 2018)
  • The Locksmith’s Daughter, by Karen Brooks (July 2018)
  • Lands of Lost Borders: A Journey on the Silk Road, by Kate Harris (August 2018)
  • All Happy Families, by Jeann McCullogh (August 2018)
  • The Man Who Couldn’t Miss: A Stewart Hoag Mystery, by David Handler (August 2018)
  • Another Woman’s Husband, by Gill Paul (August 2018)
  • Second Time Sweeter, by Beverly Jenkins (August 2018)
  • The Secret of the Irish Castle, by Santa Montefiore (August 2018)
  • Baby, You’re Gonna Be Mine: Stories, by Kevin Wilson (August 2018)
  • French Exit, by Patrick deWitt (August 2018)
  • Scarface and the Untouchable: Al Capone, Eliot Ness, and the Battle for Chicago, by Max Allan Collins & A. Brad Schwartz (August 2018)
  • Horse, by Talley English (August 7, 2018)
  • Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge, by Susan Hand Shetterly (August 7, 2018)
  • Temper, by Nicky Drayden (August 2018)
  • The Story of H, by Marina Perezagua (August 2018)
  • Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island, by Earl Swift (August 2018)
  • We That Are Young, by Preti Taneja (August 30, 2018)
  • Putney, by Sofka Zinovieff (August 2018)
  • Ahab Return, or the Last Voice, by Jeffrey Ford (August 2018)
  • Other People’s Love Affairs: Stories, by D. Wystan Owen (August 21, 2018)
  • The Cut Out Girl: A Story of War and Family, Lost and Found, by Bart Van Es (August 14, 2018)
  • Connect, by Julian Gough (August 2018)
  • Sweet Little Lies, by Caz Frear (August 2018)
  • The Sea Queen, by Linnea Hartsuyker (August 2018)
  • Under a Dark Sky, by Lori Rader-Day (August 2018)
  • An Unwanted Guest, by Shari LaPena (August 7, 2018)
  • A River of Stars
  • The Real Lolita: The Kidnapping of Sally Horner and the Novel that Scandalized the World, by Sarah Weinman (September 2018)
  • Ordinary People, by Diana Evans (September 2018)
  • A Key to Treehouse Living, by Elliot Reed (September 2018)
  • Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard (September 2018)
  • Lake Success, by Gary Shteyngart (September 4, 2018)
  • Not Our Kind, by Kitty Zelds (September 2018)
  • The Order of the Day, by Eric Vuillard (September 25, 2018)
  • Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall, by Tim Mohr (September 11, 2018)
  • Washington Black, by Esi Edugyan (September 2018)
  • How to Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler, by Ryan North (September 18, 2018)
  • Astounding: John W. Campbell, Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, L. Ron Hubbard, and the Golden Age of Science Fiction, by Alec Nevala-Lee (October 2018)
  • Family Trust, by Kathy Wang (October 2018)
  • When the Men Were Gone, by Marjorie Herrera Lewis (October 2018)
  • News of Our Loved Ones, by Abigail DeWitt (October 2018)
  • Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver (October 2018)
  • The Lost Letters of William Woolf, by Helen Cullen (October 2, 2018)
  • Evergreen Tidings from the Baumgartners, by Gretchen Anthony (October 16, 2018)
  • Dracul, by Dacre Stoker & J.D. Barker (October 2, 2018)
  • The Collector’s Apprentice, by B.A. Shapiro (October 16, 2018)
  • Gone So Long, by Andre Dubus III (October 2018)
  • Trinity, by Louisa Hall (October 2018)
  • The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland, by Nicolai Houm, transl. Anna Patterson (October 2018)
  • Melmoth, by Sarah Perry (October 2018)
  • Vita Nostra, by Marina & Sergey Dyachenko, transl. Julia Meitov Hersey (November 2018)
  • Prague Spring, by Simon Mawer (November 2018)
  • The Museum of Modern Love, by Heather Rose (November 27, 2018)
  • Hannah Green and Her Unfeasibly Mundane Existence, by Michael Marshall Smith (November 6, 2018)
  • The Dakota Winters, by Tom Barbash (December 2018)
  • Annelies, by David R. Gillham (January 15, 2019)
  • The Au Pair, by Emma Rous (January 8, 2019)
  • House of Stone, by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma (January 2019)
  • The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict (January 8, 2019)
  • Bowlaway, by Elizabeth McCracken (February 2019)
  • A Princess in Theory (Reluctant Royals, #1), by Alyssa Cole (Undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 211 (ALA Midwinter 2019, January 25-29, 2019)

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne (August 2017)
    Witty and heartbreaking and insightful. The ending made me cry.
  • The Arsonist, by Stephanie Oakes (August 2017) An interesting triple-thread YA mystery novel, linking two present-day teens with the story of an Anne Frank-style = East German teenage diarist in the final years of the Berlin Wall.
  • Summer Hours at the Robbers Library, by Sue Halperin (undated) A lightweight but gripping read, with three people who need to find a way into a community in order to move on into the next chapters of their lives.
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood (undated) This one is difficult. It’s well-written and totally gripping, and you’re definitely rooting for the couple at the center of the story, but you feel uncomfortable doing so, given who they are. It forces you to look at why you’re rooting for them and why you’re uncomfortable, as well as the many-faceted nature of consent.
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Gnomon, by Nick Harkaway (January 2018) Got about 5 pages in and couldn’t face 670 pages of dystopian fiction. Did not finish.
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • Scones and Scoundrels: The Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, Book 2, by Molly MacRae (January 2, 2018) A delightful cozy mystery. And now I want scones.
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)
  • Boardwalk Summer, by Meredith Jaeger (June 2018) I do love a happy ending, and this had more than one. Dual and unexpectedly intersecting timelines, set in present day and 1940s Santa Cruz, CA.
  • Me, Myself and Them, by Daniel Mooney (June 19, 2018) Really gets you into the head of someone suffering from severe mental illness – the fear, the anxiety, the comfort in ritual, and the way the delusions try to protect themselves from discovery.
  • The Lost Vintage, by Ann Mah (June 2018) More complicated than I expected at first, dealing with issues of family secrets and trust, mixed up with French wine and the experience of those living near the Demarcation Line in Nazi-occupied France.
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018)
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018)
  • April in Paris, 1921, by Tessa Lunney (July 3, 2018)
    Somewhat surprisingly, not a fast read, but an enjoyable one, full of 1920s life in Paris, complete with Pablo Picasso. Kiki is an interesting main character, realistically damaged by her experiences in WWI, and refreshingly not a Daisy Miller type.

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 0 (ALA Annual 2018, June 22-25)

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne (August 2017)
  • The Arsonist, by Stephanie Oakes (August 2017)
  • Summer Hours at the Robbers Library, by Sue Halperin (undated)
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood (undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Gnomon, by Nick Harkaway (January 2018)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • Scones and Scoundrels: The Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, Book 2, by Molly MacRae (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)
  • You Me Everything, by Catherine Isaac (May 1, 2018) More thoughtful than I expected it to be regarding the challenges of single parenting and degenerative illness. A good chickflicky read.
  • Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th-Century New York, by Stacy Horn (May 15, 2018) Fascinating nonfiction read on the topic of Blackwell’s Island, the 19th-century home of NYC’s charity hospitals, madhouse, almshouse, workhouse, and penitentiary. Striking to see all the ways in which we have (and haven’t) progressed.
  • All the Ever Afters: The Untold Story of Cinderella’s Stepmother, by Danielle Teller (May 2018) I do love a fairy tale retelling, and this one’s way different from the others I’ve read. Nicely done!
  • Tin Man, by Sarah Winman (May 15, 2018) Gorgeous – subdued yet passionate look at different kinds of love – parents and children, lovers, spouses, friends, family we’re born to and family we choose. Highly recommended.
  • Another Side of Paradise, by Sally Koslow (May 2018) Historical fiction based on the romance of Sheilah Graham and F. Scott Fitzgerald, which ended with his death in 1940. A look at 1930s Hollywood gossip, 1920s British Jewish slums, and the impact of alcoholism in a relationship.
  • A Reckoning, by Linda Spalding (May 2018) Honestly, I finished this only a few days ago and already I can’t remember what I thought of it.
  • Ike and Kay, by James MacManus (May 2018) Historical fiction (emphasis on the fiction part) about the relationship between General Eisenhower and his British chauffeur during WWII. Heavily speculative, but still a decent read.
  • Bobby Sky: Boy Band or Die, by Joe Shine (May 2018) Not the story I expected, but good fun, if exceedingly silly. Juvenile delinquent is offered the chance either to die in juvie or train as a secret assassin/bodyguard type, which leads to an undercover assignment in a boy band. Yes, you read that correctly.
  • The Optimistic Decade, by Heather Abel (May 1, 2018) Perfectly captures the special kind of cynical idealism of the early-college-career leftie. Set in a utopian summer camp in the Colorado Rockies in 1990.
  • The Seasonaires, by Janna King (May 2, 2018) Whee, another book about the Evils of Social Media. Good beach read, maybe, but absolutely nothing of substance.
  • The Queen of Sorrow, by Sarah Beth Durst (May 2018) I don’t know what end I expected to this trilogy, but this wasn’t it. I’m not disappointed, though, just left thinking, rather than satiated.
  • The Honey Farm, by Harriet Alida Lye (May 2018) The first 3/4 or so was fascinating, and then it got REAL weird. And didn’t finish so much as just kinda stop.
  • The Poppy War, by R. F. Kuang (May 2018) LOVED THIS. Fantasy inspired by the Opium Wars in China – it’s grim and VERY violent, but totally gripping. I hope there’s more to come.
  • Fat Girl on a Plane, by Kelly Devos (June 5, 2018) If I were in a different place in my life, I might enjoy this. But I’m where I am, and it hit a nerve. Did not finish.
  • All That is Left is All that Matters, by Mark Slouka (June 2018) Bleak short stories about grief. I’m rarely drawn in by short stories, to be honest. Did not finish.
  • Boardwalk Summer, by Meredith Jaeger (June 2018)
  • Me, Myself and Them, by Daniel Mooney (June 19, 2018)
  • Left: A Love Story, by Mary Hogan (June 2018) Big fat “meh.”
  • The Emperor of Shoes, by Spencer Wise (June 5, 2018) After 70 pages, it still wasn’t holding my interest. Did not finish.
  • The Lost Vintage, by Ann Mah (June 2018)
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018)
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018)
  • April in Paris, 1921, by Tessa Lunney (July 3, 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 22 (ALA Annual 2018, June 22-25)

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne (August 2017)
  • The Arsonist, by Stephanie Oakes (August 2017)
  • Summer Hours at the Robbers Library, by Sue Halperin (undated)
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood (undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Gnomon, by Nick Harkaway (January 2018)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • Scones and Scoundrels: The Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, Book 2, by Molly MacRae (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • The Diminished, by Kaitlyn Sage Patterson (April 10, 2018) Fast, fun YA fantasy – first in planned duology (appropriate, for worldbuilding based on twins!). Looking forward to the second volume expected next year.
  • The Spirit Photographer, by Jon Michael Varese (April 2018) Strange story based on the post-Civil War enthusiasm for “spirit photography,” distrusted by many and promoted by some spiritualists. Teeters on the edge of Southern Gothic at times.
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • Lawn Boy, by Jonathan Evison (April 3, 2018) Annoyed by narrative style. Abandoned after 30 pages.
  • Undiscovered Country, by Kelly O’Connor McNees (April 3, 2018) So good. I finished it in a few hours and then was sad to leave Lorena Hickok’s strong and compelling voice.
  • Varina, by Charles Frazier (April 2018) Slogged through it because I felt bad about abandoning my sole attempt to read Cold Mountain when I was in high school, but it was indeed kind of a slog…
  • Noir, by Christopher Moore (April 2018) Not my thing but I know Moore is popular so I’ll just leave it there. Abandoned quickly.
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)
  • The Magnificent Esme Wells, by Adrienne Sharp (April 2018) Huh, a second book in one batch about a Vegas showgirl. This time set in the 1950s and the influence of Jewish mobsters on the development of the Las Vegas we all know and love today.
  • The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer (April 3, 2018) Not as much there there as I expected, if you see what I mean. Worth the read, but frankly it felt like it could have dug in a bit more. For a story about generational feminism, one of the most interesting character arcs belonged to a man.
  • Macbeth, by Jo Nesbø (April 2018) Novelization of the Shakespeare play, set in a drug-riddled town in 1970s Scotland. The title character is an ambitious police officer. The entire piece exists in a twilight world of grime and gloom. Magnificently written and, naturally, extremely violent.
  • The Oracle Year, by Charles Soule (April 3, 2018) More thoughtful than you might expect from the subject matter – if you have information about the future that can influence behavior on a large scale, what do you do with it?
  • You Me Everything, by Catherine Isaac (May 1, 2018)
  • Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th-Century New York, by Stacy Horn (May 15, 2018)
  • All the Ever Afters: The Untold Story of Cinderella’s Stepmother, by Danielle Teller (May 2018)
  • Tin Man, by Sarah Winman (May 15, 2018)
  • Another Side of Paradise, by Sally Koslow (May 2018)
  • A Reckoning, by Linda Spalding (May 2018)
  • Ike and Kay, by James MacManus (May 2018)
  • Bobby Sky: Boy Band or Die, by Joe Shine (May 2018)
  • The Optimistic Decade, by Heather Abel (May 1, 2018)
  • The Seasonaires, by Janna King (May 2, 2018)
  • The Queen of Sorrow, by Sarah Beth Durst (May 2018)
  • The Honey Farm, by Harriet Alida Lye (May 2018)
  • Fatal Throne: The Wives of Henry VIII Tell All (May 1, 2018) By having each woman (and Henry) written by a different author, this book effectively made all six women protagonists, instead of rivals. Nowhere near as trashy as the title sounds. Well done.
  • The Poppy War, by R. F. Kuang (May 2018)
  • Fat Girl on a Plane, by Kelly Devos (June 5, 2018)
  • All That is Left is All that Matters, by Mark Slouka (June 2018)
  • Boardwalk Summer, by Meredith Jaeger (June 2018)
  • Me, Myself and Them, by Daniel Mooney (June 19, 2018)
  • Left: A Love Story, by Mary Hogan (June 2018)
  • The Emperor of Shoes, by Spencer Wise (June 5, 2018)
  • The Lost Vintage, by Ann Mah (June 2018)
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018)
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018)
  • April in Paris, 1921, by Tessa Lunney (July 3, 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 53 (ALA Annual 2018, June 22-25)

National Poetry Month

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I’m taking a course on Shakespeare and we discussed Romeo and Juliet through the lens of the sonnet format. This led me to recall a favorite sonnet, found in Gaudy Night, by Dorothy L. Sayers:

Here, then, at home, by no more storms distrest,

Folding laborious hands we sit, wings furled;

Here in close perfume lies the rose-leaf curled,

Here the sun stands and knows not east nor west,

Here no tide runs; we have come, last and best,

From the wide zone through dizzying circles hurled,

To that still centre where the spinning world

Sleeps on its axis, to the heart of rest.

 

Lay on thy whips, O Love, that me upright,

Poised on the perilous point, in no lax bed

May sleep, as tension at the verberant core

Of music sleeps; for, if thou spare to smite,

Staggering, we stoop, stooping, fall dumb and dead,

And, dying so, sleep our sweet sleep no more.

ALA and Organizational Promotion

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I’m happy to say that I am a member of ALA’s 2018 Class of Emerging Leaders, which is a prestigious and exciting thing. My teammates and I are working on a toolkit for the New Members Round Table, a group that naturally attracts the bulk of young professionals and new members of the library work force. Part of our toolkit is a sort of ALA 101, trying to break through the haze of acronyms to explain the eleven divisions and twenty-one round tables within the American Library Association.

Everyone I’ve contacted with regards to this project has been enthusiastic and eager to help if they can. The idea that new members might need some assistance in locating an ALA “home” is one with which there is no disagreement.

But that’s where things start to crumble.

For an organization serving a profession so inextricably linked to technology and its rapid changes, ALA’s websites are surprisingly problematic. They are difficult to navigate, inconsistently structured from subgroup to subgroup, and often provide only minimal information. Some appear not to have been substantially updated in months, if not years. For one group I tried to contact, the single visible means of doing so led to a defunct email address.

I am reaching out to the divisions and round tables to inquire about the resources they already have for new and prospective members, to try and compile what currently exists and see where there may be gaps. And oh, are there ever gaps.

I am shocked by how many responses indicate that little to no energy is given to attracting and retaining new members. At ALA conferences, I hear grumblings about drops in membership, less involvement from young professionals, and so forth. If you put no effort into explaining what you do, who you represent, and how membership could be mutually beneficial, why would young professionals dedicate portions of their frankly inadequate salaries, limited professional development support, and vacation time to involvement? It’s a build-it-and-they-will-come mentality that frankly baffles me.

I’m not saying that millennials are special snowflakes that need to be courted. I’m saying we’re underpaid, overworked, and unimpressed by an organization that presents itself in such a clunky way. Many of my peers fail to see value in ALA membership.

Wake up, ALA. A generational shift is happening right now. Boomers are retiring. You need us. I know that change in such a large organization usually happens slowly, but if ALA is to evolve into the professional powerhouse for the 21st century that we need it to be, it needs to get to work.

Get your websites up to date. Make the navigation and content categories consistent. Write the descriptions of what each group does and who it serves in clear language, rather than buzzword-laden formality.

My peers and those entering the library work force every day have energy and ideas, if only you would meet us halfway by showing a little enthusiasm for our presence. And I know that you can – I myself have met with nothing but welcomes and invitations to play a part in some efforts to enact some of these very changes. The divisions and round tables need to promote themselves. Make it easy to contact someone with questions about involvement, membership, and cross-group efforts.

Get on this. You can do better.

ARC Readathon Update

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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne (August 2017)
  • The Arsonist, by Stephanie Oakes (August 2017)
  • Summer Hours at the Robbers Library, by Sue Halperin (undated)
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood (undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Gnomon, by Nick Harkaway (January 2018)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • Scones and Scoundrels: The Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, Book 2, by Molly MacRae (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Nine Irish Lives: The Fighters, Thinkers & Artists Who Helped Build America, edited by Mark Bailey (March 6, 2018) 10 current Irish-Americans write essays about earlier Irish-American immigrants who they admire. Learned a lot, and enjoyed the different voices.
  • All the Beautiful Girls, by Elizabeth J. Church (March 6, 2018) The beautiful, sad, and hopeful story of a girl who survives loss, abuse, and the life of a Las Vegas showgirl in the 1960s to find herself . The story has a shimmering quality.
  • Frat Girl, by Kiley Roach (March 27, 2018) Bailed after 30 pages. The author is not without potential, but she’s 19 (it shows) and writing what she knows – unfortunately that ends up being a poorly-disguised story of a Stanford freshman year with a frankly implausible set of plot devices.
  • I Have Lost My Way, by Gayle Forman (March 2018) Ethereal and powerful story about 24 hours in which three young adults (around 19) face the total collapse of their lives’ plans, and through interacting with each other, begin to come up with plans B and C for themselves.
  • One Kiss or Two? The Art and Science of Saying Hello, by Andy Scott (March 2018)
    Light but thoughtful piece of social anthropology that has me totally over-analyzing my own handshake.
  • Twelve Steps to Normal, by Farrah Penn (March 13, 2018) Better than I expected, and for the right kid, this could be a revelation and a lifeline.
  • Beneath a Prairie Moon, by Kim Vogel Sawyer (March 20, 2018) A simple story in many respects, about a frontier town preparing for the arrival of a group of mail-order brides, but pleasing.
  • The Price of a Haircut, by Brock Clarke (March 13, 2018) Read the first three stories in the collection, found nothing I could force myself to enjoy, and ditched it.
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • The Diminished, by Kaitlyn Sage Patterson (April 10, 2018)
  • The Spirit Photographer, by Jon Michael Varese (April 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • Lawn Boy, by Jonathan Evison (April 3, 2018)
  • Undiscovered Country, by Kelly O’Connor McNees (April 3, 2018)
  • Varina, by Charles Frazier (April 2018)
  • Noir, by Christopher Moore (April 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)
  • Family & Other Catastrophes, by Alexandra Borowitz (April 10, 2018) After 20 pages, I just couldn’t stand the main character. Manic pixie dream girl? Possibly. Definitely manic.
  • The Soul of a Thief, by Steven Hartov (April 17, 2018)
    Bumpy start but grew on me. A SS adjutant during WWII is hiding two things: his single Jewish ancestor and his (requited!) love for his colonel’s unwilling French mistress.
  • First, We Make the Beast Beautiful, by Sarah Wilson (April 2018) Bailed after 60 pages. Not as deep as it thinks it is.
  • The Magnificent Esme Wells, by Adrienne Sharp (April 2018)
  • The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer (April 3, 2018)
  • Macbeth, by Jo Nesbø (April 2018)
  • The Oracle Year, by Charles Soule (April 3, 2018)
  • We Own the Sky, by Luke Allnut (April 3, 2018) Magnificent exploration of the stages of grieving as told by a father watching his young son be diagnosed with a malignant, inoperable brain tumor. I’m now dehydrated from the bawling.
  • You Me Everything, by Catherine Isaac (May 1, 2018)
  • Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th-Century New York, by Stacy Horn (May 15, 2018)
  • All the Ever Afters: The Untold Story of Cinderella’s Stepmother, by Danielle Teller (May 2018)
  • Tin Man, by Sarah Winman (May 15, 2018)
  • Another Side of Paradise, by Sally Koslow (May 2018)
  • A Reckoning, by Linda Spalding (May 2018)
  • Ike and Kay, by James MacManus (May 2018)
  • Bobby Sky: Boy Band or Die, by Joe Shine (May 2018)
  • The Optimistic Decade, by Heather Abel (May 1, 2018)
  • The Seasonaires, by Janna King (May 2, 2018)
  • The Queen of Sorrow, by Sarah Beth Durst (May 2018)
  • The Honey Farm, by Harriet Alida Lye (May 2018)
  • Fatal Throne: The Wives of Henry VIII Tell All (May 1, 2018)
  • The Poppy War, by R. F. Kuang (May 2018)
  • Fat Girl on a Plane, by Kelly Devos (June 5, 2018)
  • All That is Left is All that Matters, by Mark Slouka (June 2018)
  • Boardwalk Summer, by Meredith Jaeger (June 2018)
  • Me, Myself and Them, by Daniel Mooney (June 19, 2018)
  • Left: A Love Story, by Mary Hogan (June 2018)
  • The Emperor of Shoes, by Spencer Wise (June 5, 2018)
  • The Lost Vintage, by Ann Mah (June 2018)
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018)
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018)
  • April in Paris, 1921, by Tessa Lunney (July 3, 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 83 (ALA Annual 2018, June 22-25)