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PLEASE NOTE: I don’t end up keeping most of these. If you see one in the list that looks interesting to you, let me know and if I’ve still got it around, you may get lucky.

  • The Heart’s Invisible Furies, by John Boyne (August 2017)
  • The Arsonist, by Stephanie Oakes (August 2017)
  • Summer Hours at the Robbers Library, by Sue Halperin (undated)
  • All the Ugly and Wonderful Things, by Bryn Greenwood (undated)
  • Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage, by Brian Castner (December 2017)
  • Gnomon, by Nick Harkaway (January 2018)
  • Red Sky at Noon, by Simon Sebag Montefiore (January 2, 2018)
  • Scones and Scoundrels: The Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, Book 2, by Molly MacRae (January 2, 2018)
  • The Lucky Ones, by Tiffany Reisz (February 13, 2018)
  • Island of Sweet Pies and Soldiers, by Sara Ackerman (February 13, 2018)
  • Nine Irish Lives: The Fighters, Thinkers & Artists Who Helped Build America, edited by Mark Bailey (March 6, 2018) 10 current Irish-Americans write essays about earlier Irish-American immigrants who they admire. Learned a lot, and enjoyed the different voices.
  • All the Beautiful Girls, by Elizabeth J. Church (March 6, 2018) The beautiful, sad, and hopeful story of a girl who survives loss, abuse, and the life of a Las Vegas showgirl in the 1960s to find herself . The story has a shimmering quality.
  • Frat Girl, by Kiley Roach (March 27, 2018) Bailed after 30 pages. The author is not without potential, but she’s 19 (it shows) and writing what she knows – unfortunately that ends up being a poorly-disguised story of a Stanford freshman year with a frankly implausible set of plot devices.
  • I Have Lost My Way, by Gayle Forman (March 2018) Ethereal and powerful story about 24 hours in which three young adults (around 19) face the total collapse of their lives’ plans, and through interacting with each other, begin to come up with plans B and C for themselves.
  • One Kiss or Two? The Art and Science of Saying Hello, by Andy Scott (March 2018)
    Light but thoughtful piece of social anthropology that has me totally over-analyzing my own handshake.
  • Twelve Steps to Normal, by Farrah Penn (March 13, 2018) Better than I expected, and for the right kid, this could be a revelation and a lifeline.
  • Beneath a Prairie Moon, by Kim Vogel Sawyer (March 20, 2018) A simple story in many respects, about a frontier town preparing for the arrival of a group of mail-order brides, but pleasing.
  • The Price of a Haircut, by Brock Clarke (March 13, 2018) Read the first three stories in the collection, found nothing I could force myself to enjoy, and ditched it.
  • Love and Death in the Sunshine State: The Story of a Crime, by Cutter Wood (April 17, 2018)
  • My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, by Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie (April 2018)
  • The Overstory, by Richard Powers (April 2018)
  • Inseparable: The Original Siamese Twins and Their Rendezvous with American History, by Yunte Huang (April 2018)
  • Ace of Shades, by Amanda Foody (April 10, 2018)
  • The Diminished, by Kaitlyn Sage Patterson (April 10, 2018)
  • The Spirit Photographer, by Jon Michael Varese (April 2018)
  • Unbury Carol, by Josh Malerman (April 10, 2018)
  • Lawn Boy, by Jonathan Evison (April 3, 2018)
  • Undiscovered Country, by Kelly O’Connor McNees (April 3, 2018)
  • Varina, by Charles Frazier (April 2018)
  • Noir, by Christopher Moore (April 2018)
  • A Necessary Evil (Wyndham, Book 2), by Abir Mukherjee (April 3, 2018)
  • Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, By Edward Lee (April 2018)
  • Family & Other Catastrophes, by Alexandra Borowitz (April 10, 2018) After 20 pages, I just couldn’t stand the main character. Manic pixie dream girl? Possibly. Definitely manic.
  • The Soul of a Thief, by Steven Hartov (April 17, 2018)
    Bumpy start but grew on me. A SS adjutant during WWII is hiding two things: his single Jewish ancestor and his (requited!) love for his colonel’s unwilling French mistress.
  • First, We Make the Beast Beautiful, by Sarah Wilson (April 2018) Bailed after 60 pages. Not as deep as it thinks it is.
  • The Magnificent Esme Wells, by Adrienne Sharp (April 2018)
  • The Female Persuasion, by Meg Wolitzer (April 3, 2018)
  • Macbeth, by Jo Nesbø (April 2018)
  • The Oracle Year, by Charles Soule (April 3, 2018)
  • We Own the Sky, by Luke Allnut (April 3, 2018) Magnificent exploration of the stages of grieving as told by a father watching his young son be diagnosed with a malignant, inoperable brain tumor. I’m now dehydrated from the bawling.
  • You Me Everything, by Catherine Isaac (May 1, 2018)
  • Damnation Island: Poor, Sick, Mad & Criminal in 19th-Century New York, by Stacy Horn (May 15, 2018)
  • All the Ever Afters: The Untold Story of Cinderella’s Stepmother, by Danielle Teller (May 2018)
  • Tin Man, by Sarah Winman (May 15, 2018)
  • Another Side of Paradise, by Sally Koslow (May 2018)
  • A Reckoning, by Linda Spalding (May 2018)
  • Ike and Kay, by James MacManus (May 2018)
  • Bobby Sky: Boy Band or Die, by Joe Shine (May 2018)
  • The Optimistic Decade, by Heather Abel (May 1, 2018)
  • The Seasonaires, by Janna King (May 2, 2018)
  • The Queen of Sorrow, by Sarah Beth Durst (May 2018)
  • The Honey Farm, by Harriet Alida Lye (May 2018)
  • Fatal Throne: The Wives of Henry VIII Tell All (May 1, 2018)
  • The Poppy War, by R. F. Kuang (May 2018)
  • Fat Girl on a Plane, by Kelly Devos (June 5, 2018)
  • All That is Left is All that Matters, by Mark Slouka (June 2018)
  • Boardwalk Summer, by Meredith Jaeger (June 2018)
  • Me, Myself and Them, by Daniel Mooney (June 19, 2018)
  • Left: A Love Story, by Mary Hogan (June 2018)
  • The Emperor of Shoes, by Spencer Wise (June 5, 2018)
  • The Lost Vintage, by Ann Mah (June 2018)
  • Fruit of the Drunken Tree, by Ingrid Rojas Contreras (July 2018)
  • Blood & Ivy, by Paul Collins (July 2018)
  • April in Paris, 1921, by Tessa Lunney (July 3, 2018)

DAYS UNTIL I PICK UP THE NEXT BATCH OF ARCS: 83 (ALA Annual 2018, June 22-25)